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ChildGesture

Neural Bases of Multimodal Integration in Children

Total Cost €

0

EC-Contrib. €

0

Partnership

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Project "ChildGesture" data sheet

The following table provides information about the project.

Coordinator
STICHTING KATHOLIEKE UNIVERSITEIT 

Organization address
address: GEERT GROOTEPLEIN NOORD 9
city: NIJMEGEN
postcode: 6525 EZ
website: www.radboudumc.nl

contact info
title: n.a.
name: n.a.
surname: n.a.
function: n.a.
email: n.a.
telephone: n.a.
fax: n.a.

 Coordinator Country Netherlands [NL]
 Project website https://brainandmultimodality.wordpress.com
 Total cost 177˙598 €
 EC max contribution 177˙598 € (100%)
 Programme 1. H2020-EU.1.3.2. (Nurturing excellence by means of cross-border and cross-sector mobility)
 Code Call H2020-MSCA-IF-2015
 Funding Scheme MSCA-IF-EF-ST
 Starting year 2016
 Duration (year-month-day) from 2016-11-01   to  2018-10-31

 Partnership

Take a look of project's partnership.

# participants  country  role  EC contrib. [€] 
1    STICHTING KATHOLIEKE UNIVERSITEIT NL (NIJMEGEN) coordinator 177˙598.00

Map

 Project objective

Children typically learn their language in a multimodal environment as their caregivers interact with them with a variety of modalities. Especially, hand gestures are often used by caregivers to convey semantic information with speech. Thus, gestures are an important medium for children to understand speakers’ messages (McNeill, 1992). By using behavioural measures, previous studies have revealed that children and adults can comprehend and integrate information from iconic gestures and speech. For example, the Researcher found that it is hard for 3-year-olds to integrate information from speech and co-speech gestures, but 5-year-olds could perform with similar results to adults. However, behavioural measures do not provide access to the underlying neurocognitive processing of speech and iconic gestures, whereas neuroimaging techniques can provide more direct measures of the online cognitive process underlying the comprehension of co-occurring multimodal semantic information. Thus, this project examines neurocognitive processing of semantic information from gesture and speech in children and adults by using neuroimaging techniques such as EEG and fMRI. Study 1 investigates whether iconic gesture and speech are independently or bidirectionally processed in 3- and 5-year-olds and adults. Study 2 examines which brain areas are used to speech and gesture in children and adults. Two contributions are expected from this project. A practical contribution will be providing information to caregivers and teachers about how they should use their gestures to foster childrens’ language acquisition. A theoretical contribution will be providing neurobiological data on how gesture and speech are processed in children and adults. Through this project, the Researcher will obtain knowledge about neuroimaging research and his expertise will contribute to the Host institution by providing knowledge about childrens’ communication research.

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The information about "CHILDGESTURE" are provided by the European Opendata Portal: CORDIS opendata.

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