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eggXYt

EggXYt: A novel approach for sexing chicken embryos on day one before incubation - saving them from being hatched and disposed.

Total Cost €

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EC-Contrib. €

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Partnership

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Project "eggXYt" data sheet

The following table provides information about the project.

Coordinator
EGGXYT LTD 

Organization address
address: 36 KEREN HA YESOD STREET
city: JERUSALEM
postcode: 92149
website: n.a.

contact info
title: n.a.
name: n.a.
surname: n.a.
function: n.a.
email: n.a.
telephone: n.a.
fax: n.a.

 Coordinator Country Israel [IL]
 Project website https://www.eggxyt.com
 Total cost 71˙429 €
 EC max contribution 50˙000 € (70%)
 Programme 1. H2020-EU.3.2.4. (Sustainable and competitive bio-based industries and supporting the development of a European bioeconomy)
2. H2020-EU.3.2.1. (Sustainable agriculture and forestry)
3. H2020-EU.2.3.1. (Mainstreaming SME support, especially through a dedicated instrument)
4. H2020-EU.3.2.2. (Sustainable and competitive agri-food sector for a safe and healthy diet)
 Code Call H2020-SMEINST-1-2016-2017
 Funding Scheme SME-1
 Starting year 2017
 Duration (year-month-day) from 2017-03-01   to  2017-08-31

 Partnership

Take a look of project's partnership.

# participants  country  role  EC contrib. [€] 
1    EGGXYT LTD IL (JERUSALEM) coordinator 50˙000.00

Map

 Project objective

In the layer industry, chicks are culled (culling is the process of killing newly hatched poultry for which the industry has no use) by billions on an annually basis via suffocation or grinding or even more cruel methods. The males are terminated since they are not useful for laying eggs or to be bread for meat and the weak or unhealthy females are being terminated as well. Thus, more than 7 billion male chicks are killed on day of hatching generating an annual loss of ~1 Billion Dollars (cost of unnecessary hatching, human employees as sexers and waste management) ,associated carbon emissions, ethical and environmental impacts. Clearly a method for in-ovo, or embryo sex-determination prior to hatching (incubation) is thus highly desired due to both ethical and economic considerations. Our added value: We have developed a patented method –using cutting edge technologies in biology and optics - to detect the sex of the 1 day embryo immediately after being laid and before entering the 21 day incubation process. In other words, we are developing the morning after pill for chicks!!! This way, our clients - hatcheries (and practically the whole industry) are saving money, they will not need to deal with chick culling and can use the unhatched male containing eggs in secondary markets where eggs are used as an ingredient (e.g. pharma, pastry etc.). We are bringing a novel approach that contributes to i) Saving over 7 billion chick lives annually ii) Saving the industry ~ 1 Billion dollars annually and iii) adding over 7 billion eggs to the global food supply.

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The information about "EGGXYT" are provided by the European Opendata Portal: CORDIS opendata.

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