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LASTJOURNEY SIGNED

The End of the Journey: The Late Pleistocene-Early Holocene Colonisation of South America

Total Cost €

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EC-Contrib. €

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Partnership

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 LASTJOURNEY project word cloud

Explore the words cloud of the LASTJOURNEY project. It provides you a very rough idea of what is the project "LASTJOURNEY" about.

archaeological    world    archaeology    holocene    hunter    dispersion    domestication    gateway    migration    north    understand    interdisciplinary    terra    subsistence    empty    coasts    western    despite    geography    history    environmental    savannahs    cultures    richly    gatherer    palaeoecology    amidst    constituting    antarctica    palaeoclimatology    virtually    remarkable    colonisation    peopling    indigenous    diverse    continent    colonisations    demise    contributed    consideration    integrates    extinction    colonised    transition    peoples    modern    journey    south    place    cultivation    encompassing    archaeobotany    lowland    humans    andean    adaptations    environments    shifts    imbalance    biology    ancient    groups    cursory    zooarchaeology    unprecedented    innovative    dna    palaeoecological    incognita    american    tropical    took    redress    species    perspective    beginning    forests    geographical    momentous    last    sub    climatic    diversity    understanding    data    continental    dispersals    situated    demographic    human    america    landscapes    humanity    pleistocene    plant    regime    isotope    wealth    palaeoclimate    megafauna    global    molecular    implications   

Project "LASTJOURNEY" data sheet

The following table provides information about the project.

Coordinator
THE UNIVERSITY OF EXETER 

Organization address
address: THE QUEEN'S DRIVE NORTHCOTE HOUSE
city: EXETER
postcode: EX4 4QJ
website: www.ex.ac.uk

contact info
title: n.a.
name: n.a.
surname: n.a.
function: n.a.
email: n.a.
telephone: n.a.
fax: n.a.

 Coordinator Country United Kingdom [UK]
 Total cost 2˙498˙590 €
 EC max contribution 2˙498˙590 € (100%)
 Programme 1. H2020-EU.1.1. (EXCELLENT SCIENCE - European Research Council (ERC))
 Code Call ERC-2018-ADG
 Funding Scheme ERC-ADG
 Starting year 2019
 Duration (year-month-day) from 2019-10-01   to  2024-09-30

 Partnership

Take a look of project's partnership.

# participants  country  role  EC contrib. [€] 
1    THE UNIVERSITY OF EXETER UK (EXETER) coordinator 1˙787˙090.00
2    KOBENHAVNS UNIVERSITET DK (KOBENHAVN) participant 309˙375.00
3    MAX-PLANCK-GESELLSCHAFT ZUR FORDERUNG DER WISSENSCHAFTEN EV DE (MUENCHEN) participant 153˙875.00
4    UNIVERSIDADE DE SAO PAULO BR (SAO PAULO SP) participant 103˙125.00
5    UNIVERSIDAD DE ANTIOQUIA CO (MEDELLIN) participant 99˙000.00
6    UNIVERSIDAD NACIONAL DE COLOMBIA CO (BOGOTA) participant 46˙125.00

Map

 Project objective

Understanding the human journey of global colonisation is the history of modern humanity and the development of the diverse characteristics of peoples and cultures around the world. This five-year interdisciplinary project will investigate the peopling of South America, the last continental terra incognita (other than Antarctica) to be colonised by humans, constituting a virtually unprecedented migration of modern humans across richly diverse, empty landscapes during the Late Pleistocene-Early Holocene transition. Situated at the geographical gateway to the continent, the project will investigate one of the most momentous demographic dispersals of our species into the diverse environments of north-western South America, encompassing coasts, savannahs and lowland, Sub Andean and Andean tropical forests. This process took place amidst one of the most significant climatic, environmental, and subsistence regime shifts in human history, which contributed to the extinction of megafauna, plant domestication, and today’s remarkable diversity of indigenous South American groups. Despite its geographical importance and a wealth of archaeological and palaeoecological data across its diverse environments, north-western South America has only been given cursory consideration to understand processes of human dispersion. This project will redress this imbalance by applying an innovative interdisciplinary approach that integrates state-of-art archaeology, archaeobotany, zooarchaeology, palaeoclimatology, palaeoecology, ancient environmental DNA and isotope studies. The results will provide a global comparative perspective to the study of Late Pleistocene human colonisations, hunter-gatherer adaptations, the demise of megafauna and the beginning of plant cultivation and domestication. The results of the project have broader implications not only for archaeology but also for geography, palaeoclimate, palaeoecology, and molecular biology.

 Deliverables

List of deliverables.
Data Management Plan (DMP) Open Research Data Pilot 2020-02-20 18:06:17

Take a look to the deliverables list in detail:  detailed list of LASTJOURNEY deliverables.

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The information about "LASTJOURNEY" are provided by the European Opendata Portal: CORDIS opendata.

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