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BrainiAnts TERMINATED

Evolution of the social brain: How social complexity affects individual cognition in ants

Total Cost €

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EC-Contrib. €

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Partnership

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Project "BrainiAnts" data sheet

The following table provides information about the project.

Coordinator
CENTRE NATIONAL DE LA RECHERCHE SCIENTIFIQUE CNRS 

Organization address
address: RUE MICHEL ANGE 3
city: PARIS
postcode: 75794
website: www.cnrs.fr

contact info
title: n.a.
name: n.a.
surname: n.a.
function: n.a.
email: n.a.
telephone: n.a.
fax: n.a.

 Coordinator Country France [FR]
 Project website http://brainiants.weebly.com/contact.html
 Total cost 246˙668 €
 EC max contribution 246˙668 € (100%)
 Programme 1. H2020-EU.1.3.2. (Nurturing excellence by means of cross-border and cross-sector mobility)
 Code Call H2020-MSCA-IF-2014
 Funding Scheme MSCA-IF-GF
 Starting year 2015
 Duration (year-month-day) from 2015-08-01   to  2018-12-31

 Partnership

Take a look of project's partnership.

# participants  country  role  EC contrib. [€] 
1    CENTRE NATIONAL DE LA RECHERCHE SCIENTIFIQUE CNRS FR (PARIS) coordinator 246˙668.00
2    Boston University US (BOSTON MA) partner 0.00

Map

 Project objective

This project aims to answer a significant open question in evolutionary neurobiology: how social complexity shapes the brain structure, its associated metabolic costs, and the behavioural capability of individual members of a society. The Social Brain Hypothesis proposes that the complexity of living in group influences encephalization in vertebrates, but this theory has not been critically tested in invertebrate species. Social insects such as ants have miniaturized brains that nevertheless support highly coordinated collective behaviour and striking individual cognitive abilities. This collective behaviour produces an “externalized” distributed processing of information that may reduce energetic expenses in individual brains.

We propose to address this question through the study of brain metabolic costs of ant foragers under different conditions of sociality. We will examine the effect of distributed information processing (such as the use of pheromones trails to coordinate group activity) on individual cognitive abilities (such as learning) and the energetic costs of specialized brain compartments that underlie behaviour. Our interdisciplinary methodology will combine techniques applied to the study of collective animal behaviour (individual tracking in collective choice and foraging experiments) and neurobiology (immunohistochemistry and neuroanatomical scaling, cytochrome oxidase staining and learning assays) in sister clades of ants that show strong differences in social complexity and thus the relative roles of individual workers and cooperative groups. This novel and integrated approach will allow us to analyze the evolutionary relationship between social complexity and brain evolution.

 Publications

year authors and title journal last update
List of publications.
2017 J. Frances Kamhi, Sara Arganda, Corrie S. Moreau, James F. A. Traniello
Origins of Aminergic Regulation of Behavior in Complex Insect Social Systems
published pages: , ISSN: 1662-5137, DOI: 10.3389/fnsys.2017.00074
Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience 11 2019-06-18

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The information about "BRAINIANTS" are provided by the European Opendata Portal: CORDIS opendata.

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