Opendata, web and dolomites

SignalingDynamics SIGNED

Signaling dynamics in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation during development and homeostasis

Total Cost €

0

EC-Contrib. €

0

Partnership

0

Views

0

Project "SignalingDynamics" data sheet

The following table provides information about the project.

Coordinator
KONINKLIJKE NEDERLANDSE AKADEMIE VAN WETENSCHAPPEN - KNAW 

Organization address
address: KLOVENIERSBURGWAL 29 HET TRIPPENHUIS
city: AMSTERDAM
postcode: 1011 JV
website: www.knaw.nl

contact info
title: n.a.
name: n.a.
surname: n.a.
function: n.a.
email: n.a.
telephone: n.a.
fax: n.a.

 Coordinator Country Netherlands [NL]
 Total cost 1˙500˙000 €
 EC max contribution 1˙500˙000 € (100%)
 Programme 1. H2020-EU.1.1. (EXCELLENT SCIENCE - European Research Council (ERC))
 Code Call ERC-2019-STG
 Funding Scheme ERC-STG
 Starting year 2020
 Duration (year-month-day) from 2020-03-01   to  2025-02-28

 Partnership

Take a look of project's partnership.

# participants  country  role  EC contrib. [€] 
1    KONINKLIJKE NEDERLANDSE AKADEMIE VAN WETENSCHAPPEN - KNAW NL (AMSTERDAM) coordinator 1˙500˙000.00

Map

 Project objective

Tight coordination between proliferation and differentiation is key to proper development and homeostasis of multicellular systems. Cell-cell communication via signaling pathways has long been studied in this context. Encoding information in the temporal change of a signal, i.e. signaling dynamics, can ensure information transmission to be specific and accurate. Studies exemplifying the relevance of dynamic signaling raise the critical question: What is the function of signaling dynamics in controlling proliferation and differentiation at tissue level? My expertise in signaling dynamics, advanced light microscopy, microfluidics, development, cell cycle research and organoid culture provides a unique skill-set for the functional investigation of dynamic signaling during development and tissue homeostasis using two model systems:

Somitogenesis in vertebrate embryos is the sequential segmentation of growing tissue. It is controlled by signaling gradients and oscillations. Whereas differentiation has been studied extensively, it remains elusive (A) how cell proliferation is regulated and (B) whether there is a link between proliferation and signaling dynamics. Indeed, our preliminary data strongly indicate that cell proliferation impacts on signaling oscillations. Homeostasis of adult tissue is also maintained by signaling pathways balancing proliferation and differentiation. In the small intestine some of these pathways have recently been shown to be dynamic. We will apply a systematic approach to understand (A) are signaling pathways in the intestine dynamic and (B) what is the function. Our preliminary data support that combining organoid culture, light-sheet microscopy and microfluidic perturbation allows quantification and functional analysis of signaling dynamics.

By comparing signaling dynamics in development and homeostasis we will derive general principles of dynamic signal encoding in multicellular systems.

Are you the coordinator (or a participant) of this project? Plaese send me more information about the "SIGNALINGDYNAMICS" project.

For instance: the website url (it has not provided by EU-opendata yet), the logo, a more detailed description of the project (in plain text as a rtf file or a word file), some pictures (as picture files, not embedded into any word file), twitter account, linkedin page, etc.

Send me an  email (fabio@fabiodisconzi.com) and I put them in your project's page as son as possible.

Thanks. And then put a link of this page into your project's website.

The information about "SIGNALINGDYNAMICS" are provided by the European Opendata Portal: CORDIS opendata.

More projects from the same programme (H2020-EU.1.1.)

ECHO (2018)

Practical Imaging and Inversion of Transient Light Transport

Read More  

SYGMA (2019)

Synthetic photobiology for light controllable active matter

Read More  

GEMS (2019)

General Embedding Models for Spectroscopy

Read More