EQUALUSES

Equality for the Market. The National Usages of EU Equality Policies

 Coordinatore UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN 

 Organization address address: Place De L'Universite 1
city: LOUVAIN LA NEUVE
postcode: 1348

contact info
Titolo: Prof.
Nome: Benoît
Cognome: Rihoux
Email: send email
Telefono: +32 0 10 47 41 90

 Nazionalità Coordinatore Belgium [BE]
 Totale costo 177˙000 €
 EC contributo 177˙000 €
 Programma FP7-PEOPLE
Specific programme "People" implementing the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Community for research, technological development and demonstration activities (2007 to 2013)
 Code Call FP7-PEOPLE-2011-IEF
 Funding Scheme MC-IEF
 Anno di inizio 2012
 Periodo (anno-mese-giorno) 2012-09-01   -   2014-08-31

 Partecipanti

# participant  country  role  EC contrib. [€] 
1    UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN

 Organization address address: Place De L'Universite 1
city: LOUVAIN LA NEUVE
postcode: 1348

contact info
Titolo: Prof.
Nome: Benoît
Cognome: Rihoux
Email: send email
Telefono: +32 0 10 47 41 90

BE (LOUVAIN LA NEUVE) coordinator 177˙000.00

Mappa


 Word cloud

Esplora la "nuvola delle parole (Word Cloud) per avere un'idea di massima del progetto.

norm    influence    recent       examined    fight    belgium    paid    kingdom    action    model    life    gender    market    policy    years    reforms    usages    sweden    europeanization    private    anti    political    discrimination    models    national    united    actors    reconciliation    standpoint    policies    mechanisms    rights    equaluses    equality    then    public    shift    transformations   

 Obiettivo del progetto (Objective)

'This research project consists in analysing the influence and effects of European policies on national transformations in the fields of reconciliation between paid work and private life and anti-discrimination. More precisely, this research project ambitions to contribute to the understanding of the concrete mechanisms thanks to which the EU contribute to the transformation of national models of reconciliation and anti-discrimination, not by imposing a common model or precise reforms but by providing actors with resources useful for their political work and strategies. In this sense, the development of an approach based on the “national usages of Europe” will contribute to the academic debate on the Europeanization of public policies. The research question that will be examined in the EQUALUSES project is whether the utilitarian shift in policies combating discrimination and reconciling paid work and private life at the EU level has also occurred at the national level and what has been the possible influence of the EU on national developments. In order to do so, this project will compare policy reforms in Belgium, Sweden and the United Kingdom since the beginning of the 1990s, while attempting to identify the EU’s role in these evolutions. From a theoretical standpoint, this project aims at participating to the “sociological turn” in the study of the European Union and to complement the dominantly institution-focused approach of this literature, which has led to an underestimation of the discretion and role of political actors in the adaptation processes, especially by taking into account new social practices opened up by the process of Europeanization. From a methodological standpoint, the use of CAQDAS techniques and Qualitative Comparative Analyses will provide some grounds for ‘modest generalization’ beyond the 3 core country cases.'

Introduzione (Teaser)

Comparing policy reforms in Belgium, Sweden and the United Kingdom provides new comparative light on the long-term transformations of European gender equality policy.

Descrizione progetto (Article)

Promoting gender equality has been prevalent in the EU for many years, where it is claimed to be excellent compared to other European policies. Along with fighting against sex-based discrimination, promoting gender equality is the main area that has gone above and beyond what is justified by the fluidisation of the market.

An EU-funded project, 'Equality for the market. The national usages of EU equality policies' (EQUALUSES), has examined whether the EU still allows for the implementation of public action to promote the fight against gender inequalities. Analysis of the evolution of the gender regime of the EU in different periods was conducted. The market norm and equality norm that both characterise European policy have undergone changes in creating models of public action for promoting gender equality. These models include the exception model created in the 1980s until the mid-1990s, then the anti-discrimination model for another 10 years, up to the current rights model.

The models have shifted in a gradual and transformative manner. Although European gender equality policy underwent profound upheavals in terms of changes in goals, means, and ways of operating and thinking, the mechanisms of change are based in continuity. The shift in process is seen as a pattern of institutionalisation, then normalisation and, finally, marginalisation.

Recent changes show that there is a dismantling of European gender equality policy. Change is made without formal decision and with little visibility, but at the same time concerns all policy areas. Yet, some areas of gender equality policy are maintained or developing, such as the fight against violence towards women.

European gender equality policy is attached to justice and human rights in administrative as well as cognitive terms. Its institutional, financial and normative autonomy have been significantly reduced. This increased as a result of the recent economic and budgetary crisis in Europe. The results of the study will be useful in determining future trends.

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