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Neuronal Trafficking SIGNED

Mechanisms of synaptic growth and plasticity

Total Cost €

0

EC-Contrib. €

0

Partnership

0

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Project "Neuronal Trafficking" data sheet

The following table provides information about the project.

Coordinator
FACULDADE DE CIENCIAS MEDICAS DA UNIVERSIDADE NOVA DE LISBOA 

There are not information about this coordinator. Please contact Fabio for more information, thanks.

 Coordinator Country Portugal [PT]
 Project website http://cedoc.unl.pt/neuronal-vision-disorders/
 Total cost 160˙635 €
 EC max contribution 160˙635 € (100%)
 Programme 1. H2020-EU.1.3.2. (Nurturing excellence by means of cross-border and cross-sector mobility)
 Code Call H2020-MSCA-IF-2014
 Funding Scheme MSCA-IF-EF-RI
 Starting year 2016
 Duration (year-month-day) from 2016-03-01   to  2018-02-28

 Partnership

Take a look of project's partnership.

# participants  country  role  EC contrib. [€] 
1    UNIVERSIDADE NOVA DE LISBOA PT (LISBOA) coordinator 160˙635.00
2    FACULDADE DE CIENCIAS MEDICAS DA UNIVERSIDADE NOVA DE LISBOA PT (LISBOA) coordinator 0.00

Map

 Project objective

My long-term goal is to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern synaptic growth and plasticity, and how dysfunction in these pathways contributes to disease. Neurons are the most morphologically diverse cell type whose morphology determines many functional aspects of a neuronal network. The primary shape of a neuron is established during axon and dendrite outgrowth and synapse formation, but is subject to subsequent modifications by physiological events. In response to changes in synaptic activity, neurons can alter both pre and postsynaptic elements of the synapse. Defects in synaptic morphology and in activity-dependent plasticity are a hallmark of several neurodegenerative and cognitive disorders. It is therefore critical to know the basic mechanisms by which neurons acquire their shape and change it in response to activity, and to dissect the genes that regulate these processes. To address these questions, this proposal is divided in the following aims: 1) To dissect the postsynaptic role of the Ral/exocyst pathway in synaptic growth and activity-dependent plasticity

2) To uncover novel regulators of neuronal membrane trafficking
. My strategy is to use the relatively simple nervous system of Drosophila to uncover novel cellular and molecular mechanisms that control synaptic development and plasticity, in order to understand how membrane traffic is regulated to form and modify neuronal structures. Because 75% of all human disease genes have related sequences in Drosophila and nearly a third are predicted to have functionally equivalent counterparts, I expect that these studies in Drosophila will contribute to the dissection of the mechanisms that, when disrupted, may lead to disease. This will help identify points of intervention, therefore directing novel therapies to help curing or ameliorating the symptoms present in many neurological disorders.

Are you the coordinator (or a participant) of this project? Plaese send me more information about the "NEURONAL TRAFFICKING" project.

For instance: the website url (it has not provided by EU-opendata yet), the logo, a more detailed description of the project (in plain text as a rtf file or a word file), some pictures (as picture files, not embedded into any word file), twitter account, linkedin page, etc.

Send me an  email (fabio@fabiodisconzi.com) and I put them in your project's page as son as possible.

Thanks. And then put a link of this page into your project's website.

The information about "NEURONAL TRAFFICKING" are provided by the European Opendata Portal: CORDIS opendata.

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