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PhiGe SIGNED

Philosophy and Genre: Creating a Textual Basis for African Philosophy

Total Cost €

0

EC-Contrib. €

0

Partnership

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Project "PhiGe" data sheet

The following table provides information about the project.

Coordinator
UNIVERSITAT BAYREUTH 

Organization address
address: UNIVERSITATSSTRASSE 30
city: BAYREUTH
postcode: 95447
website: www.uni-bayreuth.de

contact info
title: n.a.
name: n.a.
surname: n.a.
function: n.a.
email: n.a.
telephone: n.a.
fax: n.a.

 Coordinator Country Germany [DE]
 Total cost 1˙997˙762 €
 EC max contribution 1˙997˙762 € (100%)
 Programme 1. H2020-EU.1.1. (EXCELLENT SCIENCE - European Research Council (ERC))
 Code Call ERC-2018-COG
 Funding Scheme ERC-COG
 Starting year 2020
 Duration (year-month-day) from 2020-04-01   to  2025-03-31

 Partnership

Take a look of project's partnership.

# participants  country  role  EC contrib. [€] 
1    UNIVERSITAT BAYREUTH DE (BAYREUTH) coordinator 1˙835˙887.00
2    THE UNIVERSITY OF WARWICK UK (COVENTRY) participant 161˙875.00
3    SCHOOL OF ORIENTAL AND AFRICAN STUDIES ROYAL CHARTER UK (LONDON) participant 0.00

Map

 Project objective

The project pioneers a multilingual approach to African philosophy, based on an understanding of philosophy as expressed through texts. In contrast to definitions of philosophical texts as non-fictional, written sources (Hountondji), we insist on a much more inclusive definition of “text”: both oral and written texts, fictional and non-fictional ones, public and private ones are considered in this project. A rigorous study of texts, working across multiple genres and several languages, is the first step in the development of an African philosophy derived from local African cultures, rather than from global, colonial or neo-colonial concerns, as is to date the case in the “mainstream” discipline of “African Philosophy”. This project establishes such a textual basis for African philosophy. This bottom-up approach necessitates a reconsideration of the nature, methods, and themes of philosophy, but also of its textual strategies, its use of language, of the nature of representation, and of the relationship between imaginative literature and theoretical thought.

The key premise of our project is that to understand the philosophical meaning of texts, it is necessary to start with an analysis of textual genres. Genres anchor texts in context, in culture and language. How exactly does genre impact meaning? To answer this central question of our research, we work comparatively on several genres of literature in eight African and European languages. The case studies include the essay in Ciluba and French, the novel in Swahili, Shona, Ciluba, Lingala, French, and English, digital texts such as blogs and social media, scenario planning narratives, Sufi poetry in Swahili and Wolof, and Alexis Kagame’s poetic work in Kinyarwanda and French, travestying the traditional genres of dynastic, heroic and pastoral poetry.

Challenging the conventional limits of both philosophy and literature, our approach allows new, topical philosophical concerns to emerge from this textual basis.

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The information about "PHIGE" are provided by the European Opendata Portal: CORDIS opendata.

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