DYNAMEM

Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry at Lipid Membranes

 Coordinatore RIJKSUNIVERSITEIT GRONINGEN 

 Organization address address: Broerstraat 5
city: GRONINGEN
postcode: 9712CP

contact info
Titolo: Dr.
Nome: H.D
Cognome: Veldhuis
Email: send email
Telefono: +31 50 3634142
Fax: +31 50 3634500

 Nazionalità Coordinatore Netherlands [NL]
 Totale costo 184˙040 €
 EC contributo 184˙040 €
 Programma FP7-PEOPLE
Specific programme "People" implementing the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Community for research, technological development and demonstration activities (2007 to 2013)
 Code Call FP7-PEOPLE-2010-IEF
 Funding Scheme MC-IEF
 Anno di inizio 2012
 Periodo (anno-mese-giorno) 2012-05-21   -   2014-05-20

 Partecipanti

# participant  country  role  EC contrib. [€] 
1    RIJKSUNIVERSITEIT GRONINGEN

 Organization address address: Broerstraat 5
city: GRONINGEN
postcode: 9712CP

contact info
Titolo: Dr.
Nome: H.D
Cognome: Veldhuis
Email: send email
Telefono: +31 50 3634142
Fax: +31 50 3634500

NL (GRONINGEN) coordinator 184˙040.80

Mappa


 Word cloud

Esplora la "nuvola delle parole (Word Cloud) per avere un'idea di massima del progetto.

molecular    communication    recognition    membranes    membrane    environment    insights    vesicle    studying    lipid    combinatorial    compounds    cell    bilayer    differentiates    solution    disulphide    corresponding    dynamem    scientists    interface    drug    dynamic    synthetic    fundamental    vesicles    libraries    cells    chemistry    exchange   

 Obiettivo del progetto (Objective)

'Molecular recognition at bilayer membranes is key to many vital processes in biology, yet notoriously difficult to study. Aim of this project is to introduce a new technique to this field: dynamic combinatorial chemistry. We propose to adapt reversible thioester chemistry to this end and use it for two different purposes: (i) Discovering new synthetic receptors that are optimized for operating at the bilayer interface. This should lead to new fundamental insights into what differentiates molecular recognition at the lipid bilayer interface from the corresponding process in solution. (ii) Unraveling the mode of action of gramicidin antibiotics through covalent capture of the self-assembled superstructures formed upon incorporation of this compound in the bilayer membrane.'

Introduzione (Teaser)

Molecular recognition at the cell membrane is important for many biological processes. A European study aimed to study how cells mediate signalling and communication with their environment.

Descrizione progetto (Article)

The cell membrane apart from maintaining the shape and rigidity of cells, constitutes the interface with the environment, thereby driving communication and cell survival.

As a result, it is not surprising that it has been explored in drug development of antimicrobial compounds.Based on this, the goal of the EU-funded 'Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry at Lipid Membranes' (DYNAMEM) project was to employ dynamic combinatorial chemistry as a tool for studying the behaviour of molecules within cell membranes.

To achieve this, scientists generated synthetic vesicles that mimicked the structure and chemical properties of the lipid cell membrane.Given that some of the exchange reactions take days to complete, scientists used a custom-made formulation which led to vesicles that were stable for months.

These vesicles contain cholesterol and positively charged compounds which prohibit vesicle aggregation and precipitation.Researchers were particularly interested in studying the exchange of disulphide bonds among proteins in the cell membrane.

To this end, they designed and synthesised building blocks capable of disulphide exchange and characterised them both within and on the membrane of the vesicles.In parallel, diffusion across the vesicle membrane was examined by using different combinatorial libraries.

Scientists checked the inside and outside solution of the vesicles to find that even if only one of the two libraries could pass freely through the vesicle membrane, exchange was still achieved. Understanding whether vesicle contact is required for this exchange could result in significant knowledge on how cells interact.Overall, the work by the DYNAMEM project should lead to new fundamental insights into the mechanisms that participate in molecular recognition at the cell membrane.

Understanding what differentiates these processes from the corresponding ones in solution could have important ramifications for drug development.

Altri progetti dello stesso programma (FP7-PEOPLE)

OBESITY AND LIGHT (2013)

Bringing Obesity to Light - Do obesogenic chemicals affect lipid metabolism through changes in circadian rhythm?

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REAL-TIME ASOC (2013)

Real-time understanding of dexterous deformable object manipulation with bio-inspired hybrid hardware architectures

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EFLTEACHERS (2013)

Revitalizing EFL Teachers' Professional Development in Europe through Innovative Programs

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