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TLDR SIGNED

TL; DR (Too Long; Didn’t Read): Close and hyperreading of literary texts and the modulation of attention

Total Cost €

0

EC-Contrib. €

0

Partnership

0

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Project "TLDR" data sheet

The following table provides information about the project.

Coordinator
STICHTING KATHOLIEKE UNIVERSITEIT BRABANT 

Organization address
address: WARANDELAAN 2
city: TILBURG
postcode: 5037 AB
website: www.tilburguniversity.nl

contact info
title: n.a.
name: n.a.
surname: n.a.
function: n.a.
email: n.a.
telephone: n.a.
fax: n.a.

 Coordinator Country Netherlands [NL]
 Total cost 253˙052 €
 EC max contribution 253˙052 € (100%)
 Programme 1. H2020-EU.1.3.2. (Nurturing excellence by means of cross-border and cross-sector mobility)
 Code Call H2020-MSCA-IF-2019
 Funding Scheme MSCA-IF-GF
 Starting year 2020
 Duration (year-month-day) from 2020-09-01   to  2023-08-31

 Partnership

Take a look of project's partnership.

# participants  country  role  EC contrib. [€] 
1    STICHTING KATHOLIEKE UNIVERSITEIT BRABANT NL (TILBURG) coordinator 253˙052.00
2    THE REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA US (OAKLAND CA) partner 0.00

Map

 Project objective

In the information age, technological developments have drastically increased the amount of texts available through different media. This has led to a shift in reading habits from close reading, sustained and focused attention to the text, to hyperreading, non-linear, computer-assisted modes of reading such as skimming and scanning. Consequently, some fear, young people are losing the ability to concentrate. Many scholars align literary reading with close or deep reading and maintain a strict binary conception of this mode and hyperreading at the opposite pole. TDLR proposes that (a) readers tend to modulate between the two modes, that are more integrated than is often assumed and that (b) this is especially true for literary reading, as literary texts demand of their readers to switch between close and hyperreading. The research project will therefore ask: Does reading literature help to make us better at allocating and modulating attention? What elements in literature prompt readers to pay close attention, and what elements invite a more distracted reading? Are experienced literary readers more skilled at determining when to zoom in and close read, and when to skim? And is this skill transferable to non-literary (information) environments and texts? This study will combine textual analysis with questionnaires, eye-tracking experiments, and interviews to answer these questions.

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The information about "TLDR" are provided by the European Opendata Portal: CORDIS opendata.

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