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DOS

Domestic Servants in Colonial South Asia

Total Cost €

0

EC-Contrib. €

0

Partnership

0

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 DOS project word cloud

Explore the words cloud of the DOS project. It provides you a very rough idea of what is the project "DOS" about.

wage    forged    lay    framed    relational    heterosexual    profession    categorisation    first    criminal    period    contrast    bazaars    write    reproductive    locating    hospitals    instrumentally    religion    visibility    unsettle    did    centrally    male    gender    grounded    social    political    theoretical    juridical    bare    unproductive    relationships    houses    world    cover    foundations    servant    paradox    interactions    streets    scarce    hierarchies    nineteenth    century    histories    historians    female    pervasive    history    templates    multiplicity    question    turn    received    forms    twentieth    move    intersection    labour    axes    barracks    servants    intimacy    rigid    realm    ubiquity    economy    pasts    contemporary    worlds    household    laid    co    empirically    units    raises    explicable    eighteenth    productive    historically    imperialism    masters    caste    pi    domestic    combines    ghettoes    rank    mission    race    shared    marked    standard    households    periods    questions    mid    writing    title    moral    accounts    employer    asia    everyday    situates    south    assumptions    class    age    bases    rewritten    colonial    shape    regulation    once    marginality   

Project "DOS" data sheet

The following table provides information about the project.

Coordinator
GEISTESWISSENSCHAFTLICHE ZENTREN BERLIN EV 

Organization address
address: SCHUTZENSTRASSE 18
city: Berlin
postcode: 10117
website: www.gwz-berlin.de

contact info
title: n.a.
name: n.a.
surname: n.a.
function: n.a.
email: n.a.
telephone: n.a.
fax: n.a.

 Coordinator Country Germany [DE]
 Project website https://servantspasts.wordpress.com
 Total cost 899˙849 €
 EC max contribution 899˙849 € (100%)
 Programme 1. H2020-EU.1.1. (EXCELLENT SCIENCE - European Research Council (ERC))
 Code Call ERC-2014-STG
 Funding Scheme ERC-STG
 Starting year 2015
 Duration (year-month-day) from 2015-10-01   to  2018-09-30

 Partnership

Take a look of project's partnership.

# participants  country  role  EC contrib. [€] 
1    GEISTESWISSENSCHAFTLICHE ZENTREN BERLIN EV DE (Berlin) coordinator 587˙789.00
2    HUMBOLDT-UNIVERSITAET ZU BERLIN DE (BERLIN) participant 312˙059.00
3    UNIVERSITY OF YORK UK (YORK NORTH YORKSHIRE) participant 0.00

Map

 Project objective

Title: Domestic Servants in Colonial South Asia The ubiquity of domestic servants in contemporary South Asia has received scarce attention from historians. Servant pasts have been used instrumentally to write others’ histories. In contrast, this project centrally situates servants at the intersection of households, labour and forms of relationships. Everyday relationships between servants and masters were based upon labour and wage on the one hand and intimacy and affect on the other. The paradox of pervasive visibility of servants and their marginality in history writing is explicable once theoretical templates are laid bare. To achieve that, the project raises three key questions: 1) How did servant labour unsettle the often rigid and easy categorisation of work into ‘productive’, ‘reproductive’ and ‘unproductive’? 2) How did the multiplicity of relational axes forged around male-male, male-female and female-female affects and hierarchies question the standard accounts framed by assumptions of heterosexual interactions? 3) How did the hierarchies of social and shared worlds marked by race, class, caste, religion, rank, profession and age shape the legal, juridical and criminal bases of labour regulation? Servant histories need to move beyond the employer’s household into the realm of ghettoes, streets, bazaars, barracks, hospitals and mission houses. Two research units involving the PI and a co-applicant cover two periods of colonial history: one, the period from the early eighteenth to the mid-nineteenth; and second, from the mid-nineteenth to the twentieth century. By locating servants in the wider social, political, and moral world, the project combines empirically grounded case studies with the political economy of imperialism. It aims to develop a new understanding of labour, gender and social history, each of these in turn being rewritten, even as they lay the foundations of the first historically grounded account of domestic work in South Asia.

 Publications

year authors and title journal last update
List of publications.
2018 Nitin Varma
\"\"\"Servant Testimonies and Anglo-Indian Homes in Nineteenth-Century India\"\"\"
published pages: 216-224, ISSN: , DOI: 10.1515/9783110582765-036
James Williams, Felicitas Hentschke (Eds.), To be at Home: House, Work, and Self in the Modern World (pp. 216–224). Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter. 2019-05-20
2018 Nitin Sinha
The Idea of Home in a World of Circulation: Steam, Women and Migration through Bhojpuri Folksongs
published pages: 203-237, ISSN: 0020-8590, DOI: 10.1017/s0020859018000184
International Review of Social History 63/2 2019-05-20

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The information about "DOS" are provided by the European Opendata Portal: CORDIS opendata.

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