Opendata, web and dolomites

MORPH SIGNED

From Timbre Perception to the Creative Exploration of Musical Instrument Sound Morphing

Total Cost €

0

EC-Contrib. €

0

Partnership

0

Views

0

Project "MORPH" data sheet

The following table provides information about the project.

Coordinator
CENTRE NATIONAL DE LA RECHERCHE SCIENTIFIQUE CNRS 

Organization address
address: RUE MICHEL ANGE 3
city: PARIS
postcode: 75794
website: www.cnrs.fr

contact info
title: n.a.
name: n.a.
surname: n.a.
function: n.a.
email: n.a.
telephone: n.a.
fax: n.a.

 Coordinator Country France [FR]
 Total cost 244˙385 €
 EC max contribution 244˙385 € (100%)
 Programme 1. H2020-EU.1.3.2. (Nurturing excellence by means of cross-border and cross-sector mobility)
 Code Call H2020-MSCA-IF-2018
 Funding Scheme MSCA-IF-GF
 Starting year 2020
 Duration (year-month-day) from 2020-01-01   to  2022-12-31

 Partnership

Take a look of project's partnership.

# participants  country  role  EC contrib. [€] 
1    CENTRE NATIONAL DE LA RECHERCHE SCIENTIFIQUE CNRS FR (PARIS) coordinator 244˙385.00
2    ROYAL INSTITUTION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF LEARNING MCGILL UNIVERSITY CA (MONTREAL) partner 0.00

Map

 Project objective

Sound morphing has the potential to provide critical new insight into our understanding of timbre perception, and to deliver innovative virtual hybrid musical instruments for the creative exploration of the sonic gap which exists between traditional musical instrument sounds. Timbre, a highly complex perceptual phenomenon traditionally associated with musical instruments, is considered one of the last frontiers of auditory science. Sound morphing holds enormous promise for the investigation of timbre perception because it can gradually blur the categorical distinction between sounds by blending their sensory attributes. In this groundbreaking multidisciplinary project that fuses signal processing, experimental psychology, and music technology, I propose to use sound morphing to create continuous timbre spaces by filling the gaps between traditional musical instruments and therefore breaking the categorical perception of musical instrument timbre by the auditory illusion of hybrid musical instruments. This radically novel approach will integrate a touch user interface to enable the creative exploration of sound morphing with original virtual hybrid musical instruments that push the creative boundaries of musical expression by moving beyond the physical limitations of acoustic musical instruments and the traditional digital musical instruments that rely on them. The impact of this project will be felt across three prominent, complementary research domains, namely: signal processing; timbre perception; and musical interaction. First, this project will advance music signal processing by developing new modeling techniques specifically tailored for musical instrument sounds. Second, it will provide powerful analysis tools to further our understanding of musical timbre perception. Finally, the project aims to revolutionize musical expression by fostering new musical results through the creative exploration of continuous timbre spaces and hybrid musical instrument sounds.

Are you the coordinator (or a participant) of this project? Plaese send me more information about the "MORPH" project.

For instance: the website url (it has not provided by EU-opendata yet), the logo, a more detailed description of the project (in plain text as a rtf file or a word file), some pictures (as picture files, not embedded into any word file), twitter account, linkedin page, etc.

Send me an  email (fabio@fabiodisconzi.com) and I put them in your project's page as son as possible.

Thanks. And then put a link of this page into your project's website.

The information about "MORPH" are provided by the European Opendata Portal: CORDIS opendata.

More projects from the same programme (H2020-EU.1.3.2.)

MIGPSC (2018)

Shaping the European Migration Policy: the role of the security industry

Read More  

MathematicsAnalogies (2019)

Mathematics Analogies

Read More  

DEMOS (2019)

Disfluencies and Eye MOvements during Speech: what can they reveal about language production?

Read More