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METLINK SIGNED

METLINK: Identification of links between cancer cell growth and metabolism genes.

Total Cost €

0

EC-Contrib. €

0

Partnership

0

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Project "METLINK" data sheet

The following table provides information about the project.

Coordinator
FUNDACION CENTRO NACIONAL DE INVESTIGACIONES ONCOLOGICAS CARLOS III 

Organization address
address: CALLE MELCHOR FERNANDEZ ALMAGRO 3
city: MADRID
postcode: 28029
website: www.cnio.es

contact info
title: n.a.
name: n.a.
surname: n.a.
function: n.a.
email: n.a.
telephone: n.a.
fax: n.a.

 Coordinator Country Spain [ES]
 Total cost 158˙121 €
 EC max contribution 158˙121 € (100%)
 Programme 1. H2020-EU.1.3.2. (Nurturing excellence by means of cross-border and cross-sector mobility)
 Code Call H2020-MSCA-IF-2017
 Funding Scheme MSCA-IF-EF-ST
 Starting year 2018
 Duration (year-month-day) from 2018-10-01   to  2020-09-30

 Partnership

Take a look of project's partnership.

# participants  country  role  EC contrib. [€] 
1    FUNDACION CENTRO NACIONAL DE INVESTIGACIONES ONCOLOGICAS CARLOS III ES (MADRID) coordinator 158˙121.00
2    KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET SE (STOCKHOLM) participant 0.00

Map

 Project objective

Metabolism is crucial for cellular survival. The large amount of evidence covering metabolic entries is mainly about the enzymatic processes and single reactions happening within the metabolic map, but there is poorer understanding of the cellular growth signaling network and regulation around metabolism. With METLINK we aim at identifying new and previously undiscovered selective links between metabolic genes and cellular growth pro-survival mechanisms. The hits will be identified with the use of a pooled libraries of CRISPR/Cas9 lentiviral vectors against metabolic genes and cell cycle/ cancer genes. The metabolic library targets will be divided into sub-pools (carbohydrate metabolism: 245; inositol metabolism and lipid metabolism: 571; tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, respiratory chain, integration energy metabolism: 240; nucleotide metabolism, vitamin synthesis and biological oxidations: 361; amino acid metabolism and protein processing: 667; others: 355) and therefore be amenable to medium-throughput screening and selected metabolic processes interrogation. The cancer/cell cycle genes target will be approximately 500 genes. The screening will be initially performed on the human fibroblasts BJ and IMR90, easier to genetically modify, and later validated in other relevant cancer cell line. This will result in the identification of new Achilles’ heels in cancer within metabolism and propose new druggable targets. They will be validated and screened with a library of compounds actually present at SciLifeLab within Karolinska Institute. Lately this proposal will elucidate potential links between oncogenes or cellular growth genes and metabolic genes providing new avenues for treatment within metabolic reactions.

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The information about "METLINK" are provided by the European Opendata Portal: CORDIS opendata.

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