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RARE MAPS SIGNED

Dynamic proteomic maps of stem cell-derived neurons as a mechanistic discovery pipeline for rare neurological disease

Total Cost €

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EC-Contrib. €

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Partnership

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Project "RARE MAPS" data sheet

The following table provides information about the project.

Coordinator
MAX-PLANCK-GESELLSCHAFT ZUR FORDERUNG DER WISSENSCHAFTEN EV 

Organization address
address: HOFGARTENSTRASSE 8
city: MUENCHEN
postcode: 80539
website: n.a.

contact info
title: n.a.
name: n.a.
surname: n.a.
function: n.a.
email: n.a.
telephone: n.a.
fax: n.a.

 Coordinator Country Germany [DE]
 Total cost 162˙806 €
 EC max contribution 162˙806 € (100%)
 Programme 1. H2020-EU.1.3.2. (Nurturing excellence by means of cross-border and cross-sector mobility)
 Code Call H2020-MSCA-IF-2019
 Funding Scheme MSCA-IF-EF-ST
 Starting year 2020
 Duration (year-month-day) from 2020-06-01   to  2022-05-31

 Partnership

Take a look of project's partnership.

# participants  country  role  EC contrib. [€] 
1    MAX-PLANCK-GESELLSCHAFT ZUR FORDERUNG DER WISSENSCHAFTEN EV DE (MUENCHEN) coordinator 162˙806.00

Map

 Project objective

Rare diseases are a major unmet medical need, as is the definition of the relevant disease mechanisms. Many rare diseases affect the nervous system. These are challenging to treat, and mechanistic studies are difficult due to the inaccessibility of patient tissue. Global proteomic studies have provided insight into whole tissue or cell changes in protein abundance but lose information on protein subcellular localisation, which is important because defects in protein trafficking are implicated in many neurological disorders. In ‘RARE MAPS’ I propose an unbiased mechanistic discovery pipeline combining human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) with advanced spatial proteomics. I will use a method developed by Dr. Borner called ‘dynamic organellar maps’, which provides quantitative protein subcellular localisation information at the whole proteome level. Used comparatively, it can detect changes in protein localisation due to a perturbation, allowing unbiased screening for phenotypic changes. To develop this workflow, I will apply it to the rare neurodegenerative disorder AP-4 deficiency syndrome. AP-4 knockout hiPSCs will be differentiated into cortical neurons and maps will be made of intermediate cortical stem cells and mature cortical neurons. Comparison to control cells will enable the detection of changes to protein localisation and abundance. I will also apply the maps to brain tissue from an AP-4 deficient mouse model to detect protein mislocalisation in vivo. I will then use CRISPR/Cas9 technology to investigate the role of novel and known AP-4-associated proteins in neuronal autophagy and axonal health. This project will demonstrate the utility of dynamic organellar maps to reveal molecular mechanisms of rare neurological disorders as well as provide new insights into the pathogenesis of AP-4 deficiency and the role of protein trafficking and autophagy in the axon.

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The information about "RARE MAPS" are provided by the European Opendata Portal: CORDIS opendata.

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