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Honeyguides-Humans SIGNED

How a mutualism evolves: learning, coevolution, and their ecosystem consequences in human-honeyguide interactions

Total Cost €

0

EC-Contrib. €

0

Partnership

0

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 Honeyguides-Humans project word cloud

Explore the words cloud of the Honeyguides-Humans project. It provides you a very rough idea of what is the project "Honeyguides-Humans" about.

interacting    predict    guides    bird    origin    located    populations    community    hunters    learning    predation    eat    model    human    foraging    nest    geographical    readily    beeswax    changing    cultural    wonderful    time    honeyguide    manipulate    life    learnt    experimentally    south    africa    strikingly    mutualism    northern    feasible    extinctions    gives    honeyguides    species    cooperation    communication    local    carry    partnership    first    matching    re    phenotypic    give    remarkable    series    honey    nests    mutualistic    diversity    loss    interact    opportunity    mechanistic    ecosystems    experimental    plasticity    indicator    ask    maintenance    observational    parasitism    interactions    bees    mediate    cultures    sites    underpin    outcome    co    exposing    world    evolutionary    eastern    subdue    mosaic    ecological    maintaining    hypothesis    humans    reciprocal    varies    demonstrated    mozambique    understand    mutualisms    ignited    whom    space    vary    african    traits    hunting    site   

Project "Honeyguides-Humans" data sheet

The following table provides information about the project.

Coordinator
THE CHANCELLOR MASTERS AND SCHOLARSOF THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE 

Organization address
address: TRINITY LANE THE OLD SCHOOLS
city: CAMBRIDGE
postcode: CB2 1TN
website: www.cam.ac.uk

contact info
title: n.a.
name: n.a.
surname: n.a.
function: n.a.
email: n.a.
telephone: n.a.
fax: n.a.

 Coordinator Country United Kingdom [UK]
 Total cost 1˙998˙885 €
 EC max contribution 1˙998˙885 € (100%)
 Programme 1. H2020-EU.1.1. (EXCELLENT SCIENCE - European Research Council (ERC))
 Code Call ERC-2016-COG
 Funding Scheme ERC-COG
 Starting year 2017
 Duration (year-month-day) from 2017-06-01   to  2022-05-31

 Partnership

Take a look of project's partnership.

# participants  country  role  EC contrib. [€] 
1    THE CHANCELLOR MASTERS AND SCHOLARSOF THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE UK (CAMBRIDGE) coordinator 1˙408˙260.00
2    UNIVERSITY OF CAPE TOWN ZA (RONDEBOSCH) participant 590˙625.00

Map

 Project objective

Species interactions such as mutualism, parasitism and predation underpin much of life’s diversity. We aim to understand the mechanistic role of learnt traits in the origin and maintenance of mutualistic interactions between species, and to test their evolutionary and ecological consequences. To do so, we shall study a remarkable mutualism: the foraging partnership between an African bird species, the greater honeyguide Indicator indicator, and the human honey-hunters whom it guides to bees’ nests. Honeyguides know where bees’ nests are located and like to eat beeswax; humans have the ability to subdue the bees and open the nest, thus exposing beeswax for the honeyguides and honey for the humans. This model system gives us a wonderful opportunity to study mutualisms, because local human and honeyguide populations vary strikingly in whether and how they interact, and because we can readily manipulate these interactions experimentally. We have already demonstrated that it is fully feasible to carry out observational and experimental work at a study site we have established in cooperation with a honey-hunting community in northern Mozambique. Here, and at a series of comparative field sites we have identified in south-eastern Africa, we shall ask: is learning involved in maintaining a geographical mosaic of honeyguide adaptation to local human cultures? How does reciprocal communication between humans and honeyguides mediate their interactions? What are the effects of cultural co-extinctions on each partner and their ecosystems, and how quickly can such cultures be re-ignited following their loss? In so doing we shall test for the first time the hypothesis that reciprocal learning can give rise to matching cultural traits between interacting species. Understanding the role of such phenotypic plasticity is crucial to explain how and why the outcome of species interactions varies in space and time, and to predict how they will respond to a rapidly changing world.

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The information about "HONEYGUIDES-HUMANS" are provided by the European Opendata Portal: CORDIS opendata.

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